Keegan
Luttrell



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PALISADE,
2021

Solo exhibition at Hošek Contemporary as part of the Hošek Contemporary Prize 2021, Berlin DE. 

PALISADE explores the vulnerabilities and helplessness of humans from different perspectives, addressing both those who aspire to shield things inside and others who seek to protect themselves from the outside world. An armour has historically served to protect an individual from danger and assaults from the surrounding environment. In the context of PALISADE, an armour is not merely a barrier or protective layer against external attacks; similar to a membrane, it also seals in what is kept inside, as sometimes not speaking up is a survival mechanism. Consequently, this raises the questions of who is meant to be protected and from what.

— Text by curator, Linda Toivio.

Photos © Roman März and courtesy of the artist.




THE GAUNTLET I & II,
2021

Solo exhibition at Hošek Contemporary, 
Berlin DE. 

Submerged in water, black and white clay gauntlets gently melt away, before reassembling in hands covered with spikes and concentrated growths. Suggesting that the man-made armature is no longer necessary, it brings forth the potential redundancy of artificial barriers and their failure in protecting us from physical or emotional harm.


— Text by curator, Linda Toivio.

Photos © Roman März and courtesy of the artist.






Remainder,
2021

Group exhibition Hot Mess, Berlin DE. 

Remainder is a video work that shows the slow dissolution of a clay mask. The mask combines medieval aesthetics with an everyday object. As it is contained, the mask abstracts and water covers the object and the small particles begin dissipate. The work loops and reverses, returning the object to its original state. Remainder brings into question decay and rebirth and the evidence of this process is in full display within the mesmerising action.


Photo © Barbara Cilliers and courtesy of the artist.






Dust, 2019

Solo exhibition at Centrum, Berlin DE.

Dust consists of four armoured clay arms with vessels of water hovering above them. In the run of the exhibition, the water will slowly drip down onto them and the clay will dissolve. The gesture of decay might first recall the end of Joan of Arc, but moreover, the artist questions what happens when we remove our armour and thus the stiff façade that we maintain in public for our own protection. Are the consequences purely negative or can we not also benefit from the revelation of our vulnerable side?

— Text by curator, Max Weiland.

Photos © Ute Klein and courtesy of the artist.










For Joan, 2019

Solo exhibition at Centrum, Berlin DE. 

With her exhibition For Joan, Luttrell examines two different explorations of the meaning of armour, one that explores a narrative where armour fuses with the body to create a singular entity, highlighting the implications of this action, while the other perceives armour as a metaphor for building something that does not exist.

The title of the exhibition was inspired by the iconic figure Jeanne d'Arc – Joan of Arc – who led the French army to war against England in the 1430s, but who finally experienced how her male allies turned against her after several defeats, and sold her to the opponents. In 1431, d'Arc was put on trial. After a short process, she was burned at the stake as a witch. After a revision process to restore her honour by Charles VII in 1455, as well as her beatification in 1909, d’Arc is one of France’s national heroines.

— Text by curator, Max Weiland.

Photos © Ute Klein and courtesy of the artist. 










For Joan (film), 2019
4:18

In the video work For Joan the artist herself takes the part of Jeanne d'Arc and shows in a sensitive portrait her own interpretation of her life story. The work first shows moments of healing and peace, in which Jeanne's armour is removed. This is interrupted by an intense intermezzo, in which betrayal and death by fire are depicted in an intense visual language. For Joan, the removal of the armor becomes a necessary step to wash her defenceless body from the traces of the past.


—Text by curator, Max Weiland.

Film in Collaboration with Robin Lochmann.

With performers Billie Muraben, Jody Rogac, Leah Rosenberg and Kate Rosenberg.